Dr. Nancy Njiraini
Faculty Member
Strathmore University Business School

Dr. Nancy Njiraini is a faculty member at SBS teaching both academic and executive education programmes.

Her work experience spans across more than 25 years in various roles within marketing management, strategic management and operations, in several corporate organisations in Kenya and the United Kingdom.

Nancy has extensive experience in training and facilitating corporate business and management courses and has taught academic courses at undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

She was an examiner and moderator of professional marketing qualifications for the world-leading Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM) for close to 10 years. She was previously at the University of Glasgow before coming to SBS.

Nancy’s academic studies include an MBA in Marketing from University of Leicester, an MSc and a PhD in Teaching Adults & Adult Education both from the University of Glasgow.

Her research and teaching interests include consumer culture and social marketing, adult and lifelong learning in its various forms, critical thinking and connections between adult learning and social output that can impact social change.

Qualifications

MBA in Marketing from University of Leicester.

MSc and a PhD in Teaching Adults & Adult Education both from University of Glasgow.

She is the appointed professional trainer for MAXQDA analysis software for Kenya, providing advice and training in the use of the software for computer assisted qualitative data analysis (CAQDA).

She has a passion for research theory and practice and has been involved in teaching research as well as worked on several research projects. She is an active member in various groups and associations, has presented papers in several international conferences and contributed to various academic reports and articles.

To Contact Dr. Nancy: nnnjiraini@strathmore.edu

  1. Consumer Culture and Social Marketing
  2. Adult and Lifelong Learning in its Various Forms
  3. Critical Thinking
  4. Connections between Adult Learning and Social Output that can impact Social Change